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Artifact Resources

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Artifact Resources
HUM-200-Q1604 Applied Humanities 22EW1 JV
Announcements Artifact Resources
As you get started with your artifact research, here is a list of helpful resources. Keep in mind this
list is far from definitive. I’ll admit it is heavy on visual art because this is my area of expertise. If
you know of a credible resource that’s not on this list–but you think should be included–please
email me!
Within SNHU:
Whether you are researching a well-known painting or your great grandmother’s crazy quilt,
the Shapiro Library should be your first stop. There, you’ll find a wealth of databases,
research guides, and a general keyword search.
Databases helpful for this class include (but are not limited to) ArtSTOR, JSTOR,
Kanopy, LION, Oxford Art Online, Oxford Music Online, and Project Muse.
Helpful research guides include art history, history, HUM-200, and literature.
If you have never used the library, don’t be too shy to ask a librarian for help.
24/7 chat
Email ask@snhu.libanswers.com
Call 844-684-0456
Resources outside SNHU:
Whether your artifacts are works of visual art, music, literature, or a performing art,
the Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History should be your first stop for exploring its cultural and
historical context. Click here for information on how to use the timeline.
If you are researching visual artwork (painting, sculpture, architecture, and the
like), SmartHistory is the perfect starting point. Think of it as a website version of an
introductory art history textbook. Mouse over “Histories of Art” or “Guided Learning” to
explore the drop-down menu. You can also do a keyword search by clicking the “Search”
heading.
Another engaging art history resource is the ArtCurious podcast. Jennifer Dasal, Ph.D. (an
art museum curator) hosts the podcast with the mission of departing from the “dry, boring”
stereotype of the discipline and focusing on the “unexpected, the slightly odd, and the
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strangely wonderful in art history.” You can even access transcripts of all episodes here. If
you really like what you hear, subscribe in Apple Podcasts, Sound Cloud, or whatever you
favorite podcast aggregator is so that you’ll never miss an episode!
You can also find the complete series of Art of the Western World on YouTube. This link
goes to a playlist that starts in ancient Greece and ends in the 1980s.
Of course, museum websites are always great resources for research into visual art. A quick
search on DuckDuckGo or StartPage will reveal where artworks are housed. Large museums
like the Louvre, the Uffizi, the Tate museums, and the Art Institute of Chicago are packed
with information about their collections. Smaller museums like the 21c Museums in
Louisville and Cincinnati only contain basic information for visitors and jpegs of their
collections.
If you are researching Hokusai or any other artist from Japan’s Edo period, check out this
free ebook published by the National Gallery of Art. (This is a large PDF saved in the
Wayback Machine, so it could take several minutes to load.)
If you are researching an artifact by Vincent van Gogh, you can read his letters for free
at VanGoghLetters.org. You can do a keyword search at the top center of the page to filter
your results.
Are you researching graffiti art? Check out this interview that Cenk Uygur of The Young
Turks conducted with Shepard Fairey.
If your artifact is a work of rock and roll, hip-hop, or other contemporary music
genre, Rolling Stone is an established reliable source for news and interviews in the music
industry. For a focus on hip-hop and R&B, The Source is another good choice.
For interviews with artists in the visual, literary, and performing arts, check out the PBS
series Articulate with Jim Cotter. Here, you’ll see interviews with artists as diverse as Ani
DiFranco, Leroy Johnson, and Zaria Forman.
If you’re focusing on a work of contemporary art, check out The Guardian’s podcast The
Start, in which artists (visual, literary, and performing) discuss the influences and creative
impulses behind some of their most acclaimed works.
The BBC produces some amazing podcasts that can’t be listed in their entirety here. Most
relevant to this course are In Our Time, Arts and Ideas, History Extra, and Shakespeare’s
Restless World. A quick search (keyword: BBC) in your favorite podcast aggregator will yield
quite a few additional results!
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Whether your artifact is visual art, music, literature, cinema, theatre, or dance, you’re bound
to find reliable open-source material through Open Culture. This website contains free ebooks, lectures, music videos, interviews, and even silent movies produced between 1895
and 1927.
The arts sections of mainstream newspapers like The Guardian, the Washington Post, and
the New York Times have arts sections that might contain helpful information.
While Google’s main search site will try to bombard you with ads and base your results on
your previous searches, Google Scholar (especially when used in private viewing mode) will
give you only unfiltered, peer-reviewed (academic and credible) information. Google
Books contains some decent sources on the visual, literary, and performing arts. To avoid
encountering viewing limits, search the site in private or incognito mode.
Again, this list is not complete. It is simply meant as a jumping-off point. If you are unsure of a
source’s reliability, I am more than happy to clarify.
Happy researching!
Dr. C.

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